Robin Sedivy

Robin Sedivy

Robin Sedivy


Title
Music Producer
Bio
“The entrancing downtempo beats and hypnotic melodies will
grab hold as you immerse yourself in each track.” 
-Jeremy Bayer, Melodic Noise Media”

Despite the many challenges posed by the global COVID pandemic, Robin Sedivy (SED-i-vee), the producer behind GrayBeat’s Elemental Rhapsody decided to take action.

Coming off the heels of his first self-produced full-length release, and still determined to manifest his original vision for a GrayBeat live performance, he embraced a variety of new technologies to deliver his musical message in a completely new way.

The result is a whole new interactive series of livestreaming audio and visual performances, not only breathing new life into his music, but often exceeding his own expectations of how engaging and exciting a live stream musical performance could be. 

GrayBeat’s latest effort, GrayBeat LIVE is a fully-mastered and hand-picked collection of Robin’s favorite live audio and video performances. He uses his own innovative real-time 3D graphics and video, which he programmed to evolve with and react to changes in his improvised live audio performances.  

(GrayBeat® Bio 2021)
Website
Expertise
music producer, music performance
Interests
electronic, indie, downtempo, film / video, movies

Recent Submissions

Robin Sedivy submitted media.

Sad Song by GrayBeat

Mike Mineo

"what would you say?" vocal refrain amidst pulsing percussion concocts a hypnotic soundscape that intrigues, especially as vocals expand with a Thom Yorke-esque vigor around the one-minute mark. The flickering energy around the two-minute turn plays with infectious appeal, with a subtle blaring club-friendly element apparent in the shards of keys and percussive repetition. Vocal re-emergence around 03:09 plays seamlessly. I enjoyed the track's uniquely hypnotic soundscape throughout and subtly effective vocal work. I suppose those seeking a more fervent vocal performance wouldn't enjoy, though I find the muted vocal approach a nice fit relative to the overall soundscape achieved. Feel free to email me at mike@obscuresound.com when the track releases, and/or if you'd like to chat about my PR services' rates and success stories. Thanks for sending! -Mike

Robin Sedivy submitted media.

By The Hand by GrayBeat

Robin Sedivy submitted media.

Air Busking by GrayBeat

RADIO KSCR

I really dig this.  It is a great chill instrumental.  Definitely something that you can get lost in.  I would be happy to play it on my station. 

Leks Maltby

On "Air Busking" by GrayBeat, the great electronic experimenter starts things off slowly, with a meandering old school hip-hop influenced jam. Heavy on the beat and light on melody, this song is all about setting a very specific mood: a laid back, easy going vibe. There are jazz influences at play here, but they are not necessarily immediately obvious. "Air Busking" sounds like a song that could have been constructed entirely out of stacks of old record samples, yet somehow is organic enough to feel like it was entirely hand-made from scratch. Regardless, the end result is entirely satisfying and offers a great initial taste of what's to come from GrayBeat.

Robin Sedivy submitted media.

Crucible by GrayBeat

RADIO KSCR

I am really digging this track.  Super focused, clean, a lot of fun to listen to.  I would love to play it on the station. 

Leks Maltby

"Crucible" by GrayBeat is the most menacing song that the electronic producer has committed to tape to date. Dark synths and a pulsing electro beat set the stage for a four-and-a-half minute sonic murder mystery. Given the instrumental nature of the music, its hard to pin down a specific narrative here, but the overwhelming theme is one of sheer terror and suspense. GrayBeat's greatest strength is minimalism in approach: never letting any one instrument crowd out the rest, and always allowing each musical element enough room to breathe on the song. Things take an unexpected turn in the song's final minute when things seem to be heading towards some sort of resolution; however, almost as quickly the song returns to its original theme leaving the listener on the edge of their seat until the final seconds of the track bleed out.

Robin Sedivy submitted media.

Airship by GrayBeat

Leks Maltby

"Airship" by GrayBeat is perhaps the most ambitious piece of sonic architecture undertaken by the electronic artist to date. Clocking in at nearly seven minutes and featuring more diverse instrumentation than the average GrayBeat track, its easily the most adventurous material in an already significant body of work. Synths are still the dominant instrumentation, but the inclusion of some meandering electronic guitar during the song's intro sets a perfect tone for everything that follows. Once all the musical elements line up, everything falls into a pretty consistent groove for the duration of the song, but the changes are subtle enough to keep the average listener engaged beyond the four-minute mark. There is a distinct feeling in the song's second half that some sort of resolution is being achieved, and there is an overwhelmingly optimistic quality to the melody. As with the majority of GrayBeat's material it tends to fall into one of two camps: upbeat and cheery, or dark, moody and contemplative. Either way, the songs are compelling enough to keep fans wanting to hear more. The song's outro is the only real deviation from the song's core theme, but it does provide a welcome transition to ease the listener out of this seven-minute groove.

Robin Sedivy submitted media.

Element G by GrayBeat

Leks Maltby

On "Element G" by GrayBeat, the self-made sci-fi beat-maker lays down a five-and-a-half minute hypnotic groove. As always, the instrumental choices are subtle: a simple synth melody, a drum machine back-beat, and little else. The sonic journey here is very circuitous, less about the end destination and more about taking in the views on a sonic spin around the solar system. Definitely a soundtrack for celestial space travel, GrayBeat plays to the strength of transporting the listener to other worlds. Another standout track in a much broader narrative on sonic extraterrestrial space exploration.

Robin Sedivy submitted media.

Under The Surface by GrayBeat

Robin Sedivy submitted media.

Fisherman's Gambit by GrayBeat

Leks Maltby

"Fisherman's Gambit" is probably the most rock 'n' roll song that experimental artist GrayBeat has ever produced. The drums are live off the floor and front and centre, the bass and guitar work is likewise authentic and menacing as hell. Synths are still an important part of the song, but they help flesh out the rock solid rhythm section that's already been established by live instrumentation. There are time where this song straddles the line between rock and electro the way Radiohead so masterfully achieved this delicate balance between 1997-2000 when the gradually moved away from rock and embraced electronic arrangements and instrumentation. Perhaps more so than any other track, "Fisherman's Gambit" shows off the full range of what GrayBeat can bring to the table musically and dynamically. An absolute banger of a song without a doubt!

Robin Sedivy submitted media.

Waterlogged by GrayBeat

Leks Maltby

On "Waterlogged" GrayBeat produces his most hypnotic, mesmerizing track to date. Relying on little more than a simple repeating synth melody, the song immediately pulls the listener in and takes them on a journey. Easily the most slow-burning song in the GrayBeat catalogue, its definitely a song to get lost in. GrayBeat's greatest strength has always been making the most out of the least: a few synths, a drum machine, and imagination. Its a simple recipe but its the very simplicity of "Waterlogged" that makes it so appealing. 

Robin Sedivy submitted media.

Rocks by GrayBeat

Leks Maltby

On "Rocks" by experimental electronic outfit GrayBeat, listeners are treated to five minutes of synth-heavy instrumental bliss. Decidedly upbeat and cheery, "Rocks" is your go-to feel-good listen for self-imposed quarantine, not to mention an undisputed jam in its own right! Melodically, things stay pretty consistent throughout the duration of the song, there are many subtle sonic changes that keep the listener on their toes. Subtle addition of electronic elements likens this song to watching a skyscraper being erected by way of time-lapse video footage. By the song's end, it is infinitely more epic and fully-realized than its humble beginnings, yet that change is somehow so subtle that it is never jarring or abrupt for the listener. A true exercise in hearing a sonic masterpiece being painted live and in real time!

Robin Sedivy submitted media.

Rocks by GrayBeat

Robin Sedivy submitted media.

Waterlogged by GrayBeat